FILE - Pittsburgh

Downtown skyline of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at sunset.

Pittsburgh residents had a significantly higher amount of disposable income than the national average, while Allentown residents have just a small amount of disposable income after expenses, according to analysis by Clever Real Estate.

Clever analyzed the biweekly pay for residents in the top 75 metropolitan areas and the money they had left over after taking out for housing/utilities, groceries, health care, transportation and goods and services. Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Allentown were the Pennsylvania areas studied.

Pittsburgh residents had an average of $491.40 left over after expenses compared to the average American, who now have less than $140 left over. Residents in Philadelphia had a higher per capita income annually than Pittsburgh residents – $64,440 compared to $55,822 – but Philadelphia residents had just $114.78 left over after expenses.

Philadelphia residents spent significantly more on housing, health care and goods and services than their Pittsburgh counterparts. Here’s the breakdown of how the biweekly income was spent in the two metropolitan areas:

PITTSBURGH

Biweekly income: $2,233.54

Biweekly expenditures:

Housing: $245.58

Groceries: $108.14

Health care: $274.97

Transportation: $123.49

Non-recreational goods and services (clothing, shoes and personal care items): $864.40

PHILADELPHIA

Biweekly income: $2,478.46

Biweekly expenditures:

Housing: $346.41

Groceries: $115.95

Health care: $317.54

Transportation: $140.17

Non-recreational goods and services: $924.55

The study also looked at the metropolitan Allentown area, where residents averaged just $11.31 in disposal income. For areas where residents held on to any of their income after expenses, Allentown had the lowest amount.

The per capita income for Allentown residents is $54,120 a year. Here’s the breakdown of expenses from the biweekly income:

ALLENTOWN

Biweekly income: $2,081.54

Biweekly expenditures:

Housing: $306.98

Groceries: $113.97

Health care: $331.95

Transportation: $118.27

Non-recreational goods and services: $882.45

The study also looked at other key economic factors. The first is the number of people earning less than 125 percent of the poverty level for a family of four, about $32,750. About 18 percent of Americans make this amount. The numbers are lower in the three Pennsylvania metro areas analyzed: 14 percent in Allentown, 16 percent in Philadelphia and 15 percent in Pittsburgh.

Many people have roommates to save on housing costs. About 4.3 percent of Allentown residents live with roommates. The number is higher in Pittsburgh at 5.5 percent and even higher in Philadelphia at 8 percent.

The analysis also discovered some national trends:

• Residents who live in nonurban areas spend more than urban residents, who spend more on housing than their nonurban counterparts.

• About 31 percent of Americans have bills that are in collections.

• Americans spend most of their income on housing and utilities and the least amount on groceries.

• Six percent of metro residents have a job but are still living in poverty.

• Residents in five areas – McAllen, Texas; New Haven, Conn.; Orlando, Fla.; San Antonio, Texas and New York City – don’t make enough to pay for the average living expenses.