Marijuana plant

(The Center Square) – Marijuana advocates are continuing a push to legalize the drug for recreational use in New Hampshire, but the effort faces an unlikely path in the Republican-controlled Legislature.

A bipartisan bill filed in the state House of Representatives last week would, if approved, legalize recreational cannabis for adults over 21 and set up a system of regulation and taxation for the drug that would allow retail sales. It's similar to proposals filed in previous legislative sessions, all of which have failed to win approval.

"The battle continues," said Rep. Rebecca McWilliams, D-Concord, a primary sponsor of the bill. "We keep refining it and negotiating and trying to come up with something that could potentially get to the two-thirds vote needed to override the governor's veto."

The proposal would allow adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of weed and would authorize regulated cultivation and retail sales. Adults would be allowed to grow up to six marijuana plants at home. A state-run cannabis commission would set regulations and oversee the new industry. The proposal calls for a 9% tax on recreational pot sales.

But the measure faces a steep climb in the state Legislature – which swung back to the GOP in the Nov. 3 elections – not to mention the threat of a veto by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who opposes legalization.

McWilliams acknowledges the measure faces long odds in the biennial legislative session and said lawmakers who support the effort lack the votes to override a Sununu veto. But she said the effort is building more support with every passing year.

"Eventually it will get passed," she said. "But I don't think it will happen until we get a new governor."

While marijuana remains an illegal drug under federal law, she said there's a chance the new Democrat-controlled Congress and White House could lift the federal prohibition on pot.

Nationally, 68% of Americans back the legalization of marijuana, according to a recent Gallup poll, which noted that support has been inching up steadily over the years.

To date, at least 15 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territory of Guam have legalized recreational marijuana. Another 34 states have medical marijuana programs.

New Hampshire has often been described as a "cannabis island" with neighboring states and Canada allowing recreational marijuana cultivation and retail sales.

While the Granite State decriminalized marijuana possession in 2017, recreational growing and sales are not authorized.

In 2014, the Democrat-controlled House approved a legalization bill but it failed to pass the Senate. Similar have been refiled every session, but have failed to gain traction.

The state has also allowed medical marijuana dispensaries since 2013, but cultivating the drug for personal use is still a felony.

Lawmakers approved a bill in 2019 that would have allowed medical pot patients to grow their own supply, but Sununu vetoed it, citing public safety concerns.