Virus Outbreak-Connecticut

In this Friday, Aug. 7, 2020 file photo, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont speaks to reporters before surveying storm damage in the area in Westport, Conn.

(The Center Square) – Record keeping in the state of Connecticut has entered the digital age, the governor announced Tuesday.

Gov. Ned Lamont said more than 50 million state documents have been digitized as part of his administration’s efforts to streamline services and “produce efficiencies within state government.”

“Digitizing documents means that we can have the information we need at our fingertips and can work smarter in state government,” Lamont said in the release. “That’s the type of workplace I envision – one where we can work efficiently, collaboratively even when we’re remote, and in a way that uses the most up-to-date technology available. These public-private partnerships help us get closer to that vision and attract the best and brightest employees.”

The initiative began in 2013 with Scan-Optics, a Manchester-based data management company, in a public-private partnership, the governor said. The program makes paper documents available electronically.

Since the state began the initiative nearly a decade ago through the Department of Social Services and Access Health CT, more state agencies joined, including the Department of Administrative Services, the Department of Children and Families and Public Protection, and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the release said.

Commissioner Dr. Deidre Gifford, head of the Department of Social Services, said the “technology allows us to ensure our turnaround time for services like SNAP benefits are quicker.”

“The technology can literally help put food on the table for our residents who need it most,” Gifford said. “That’s what Governor Lamont’s modernization efforts are prioritizing. The tremendous work Scan-Optics does ensures electronic distribution of workflow to our staff and results in streamlined eligibility determination for vital food, healthcare, financial and other assistance for up to one million Connecticut residents.”

Associate Editor

Brent Addleman is an Associate Editor and a veteran journalist with more than 25 years of experience. He has served as editor of newspapers in Pennsylvania and Texas, and has also worked at newspapers in Delaware, Maryland, New York, and Kentucky.